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20121201
20121231
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of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
times." host: nancy, our next caller. independent line, michigan. who is this on? society or government? caller: it is the role of everyone in the united states. i am getting rid of my guns. my husband was a police officer. i am getting rid of all of his guns. i do not have the need for them and i do not think that it worked out for -- worked out well for her either. host: that is your personal choice. do you think that the government should follow up on that? should society do what you're doing? caller: it is up to every individual. how has this affected all of us? i think we should all work together to try our best to prevent this from happening ever again. personally, my choice is to get rid of all of the handguns and all of the weapons that were my husband's. the guns are not needed. it is my role, it is your role, it is the role of the government. host: democratic line, manhattan. good morning. cecil, what do you think? caller: all of the people that were harassing teachers about the price of what they charge their states for the work that they do, who would want to be a teacher in
states are implementing these conservative ideas. we see states like michigan join us. we do not force people to join unions and economies move and want to be a part of what is happening. when you get more parents choices of education, it tells all children, low-income children, we see it all over the country. we can prove it with research prepare. when states have the right for their own energy, the revenues that come into the government help build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that is an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. this could be more efficient and do much better than we can do under the federal area. the principles of freedom are working. we need to spot like them, a showcase them, communicate them so people see that these ideas work. at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington and see that the ideas that emplace are dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, the friends of freedom in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas of american ideas, ideas we now are working th
oversight. host: in michigan, lawrence is a democrat prepared -- a democrat. caller: as far as all the security and coverage that we have for mental health issues, will there be any more money coming from homeland security for mental health issues? we need better coverage. host: lawrence, before we let you go, do you have any sense how your local community uses, and security grant? what michigan does with the money gets from the federal government? caller: i do know we have politicians the do their best. what exactly do, i'm not sure. guest: the issue of mental health is certainly a major one facing the u.s. ran out and what happened with the tragic incidents as last week underscored the need some for mental health. -- the need for mental health. health and human services, hhs, has units that help state allen local communities address their mental health issues. host: do citizens generally have an idea what their states are using the homeland security grants for? is it on the website or their clearing houses? guest: we issued a report earlier this year that looked specifically at t
can get on air force one and go to michigan and do a rally with union members talking about right to work, then i think the commander in chief can take the time to get involved and get this marine home. we live with a very simple maxim in the military. we leave no man behind. i think the president of the united states of america should not depart washington, d.c. if jon hammmar is not going home. >> gretchen: do you believe that jay carney, when he said he didn't know about it, that he didn't actually know about it, or that he wanted to rethink how he was going to answer the question and get back to the reporter? >> either up with is bad -- either one is bad. if you don't know about it, that's unconscionable. if you're trying to play games with the life this marine -- this is despicable, this picture of him chain to do a cot. this is a war veteran, someone giving to give the last full measure of devotion to this country in iraq and afghanistan. we have an administration that has seemingly turned its back on him. i think everyone should be calling the white house right now today an
's get a republican voice. our next caller is calling from west bloomfield, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: i would like to get your thoughts on a balanced approach and have unbiased taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approach. instead of doing it through taxation, he can do it through the entitlements. guest: those are both ideas that have been raised, especially the social security and medicare benefits for the wealthy and potentially might not need them to live off of. one tricky part of that is wealthier americans have been paying these taxes for decades into social security and medicare if and a lot of folks have a problem with the idea of taking away their benefits they have paid for if just because they happen to be more well off. and issued the first caller raised and something to watch is this could really sort of set the tone for
: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. i want to take just a moment to thank our distinguished colleague and my dear friend for his wonderful service. we serve on the one hand three committees together. it's been my honor to serve on the committee that senator conrad chairs, the budget committee, and to have him serve as a senior member of the agriculture committee, which i chair, and to have both of us sit on the finance committee together. today he has done what he has always done for us, which is to provide vision, common sense, intelligence, and a lot of numbers. and they add up, and they make sense, and so in listening to senator conrad's farewell speech, i want to thank him again for giving us a path forward. this is someone who will forever be in the senate history record as one of the great statesmen of our country, someone with intelligence, respect on both sides, compassion, a fighter from north dakota like i've never seen, and someone who serves in the best tradition of what it means to be an honorable public servant. and so he's been a role model for m
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7